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Top 10 Grammar and Sentence Questions for CAT with SOLUTIONS

Grammar and Sentence Questions are part of the VARC section of the CAT exam. Through Grammar and Sentence questions, aspirants are asked to Correct the wrong sentences. The difficulty level of the Grammar and Sentence questions can be easy to moderate.

What are some CAT Grammar and Sentence Practice questions?

Question 1: There is a sentence that is missing in the paragraph given below. Look at the paragraph and decide in which blank (option 1, 2, 3, or 4) the following sentence would best fit.

Sentence: Having made citizens more and less knowledgeable than their predecessors, the Internet has proved to be both a blessing and a curse.

Paragraph: Never before has a population, nearly all of whom has enjoyed at a least a secondary school education, been exposed to so much information, whether in newspapers and magazines or through YouTube, Google, and Facebook. _(1) _. Yet, it is not clear that people today are more knowledgeable than their barely literate predecessors. Contemporary advances in technology offered more serious and inquisitive students access to realms of knowledge previously unimaginable and unavailable. _(2)_. But such readily available knowledge leads many more students away from serious study, the reading of actual texts, and toward an inability to write effectively and grammatically. _(3)_. It has let people choose sources that reinforce their opinions rather than encouraging them to question inherited beliefs. _(4)_.
A. Option 1
B. Option 2
C. Option 3
D. Option 4

Answer: D
    

What are the Must-do Grammar and Sentence questions for the CAT exam?

Question 2: There is a sentence that is missing in the paragraph below. Look at the paragraph and decide where (option 1, 2, 3 or 4) the following sentence would best fit.

Sentence: For theoretical purposes, arguments may be considered as freestanding entities, abstracted from their contexts of use in actual human activities.

Paragraph : (1). An argument can be defined as a complex symbolic structure where some parts, known as the premises, offer support to another part, the conclusion. Alternatively, an argument can be viewed as a complex speech act consisting of one or more acts of premising (which assert propositions in favor of the conclusion), an act of concluding, and a stated or implicit marker ("hence", "therefore") that indicates that the conclusion follows from the premises.. (2)_. The relation of support between premises and conclusion can be cashed out in different ways: the premises may guarantee the truth of the conclusion, or make its truth more probable; the premises may imply the conclusion; the premises may make the conclusion more acceptable (or assertible).(3)__. But depending on one's explanatory goals, there is also much to be gained from considering arguments as they in fact occur in human communicative practices.
A. Option 2
B. Option 1
C. Option 4
D. Option 3

Answer: D

What were the previous year CAT Grammar and Sentence questions?

Question 3: There is a sentence that is missing in the paragraph below. Look at the paragraph and decide in which blank (option 1, 2, 3, or 4) the following sentence would best fit.

Sentence: Easing the anxiety and pressure of having a “big day” is part of the appeal for many couples who marry in secret.

Paragraph: Wedding season is upon us and – after two years of Covid chaos that saw nuptials scaled back– you may think the temptation would be to go all out. ____(1) ____. But instead of expanding the guest list, many couples are opting to have entirely secret ceremonies. With Covid case numbers remaining high and the cost of living crisis meaning that many couples are feeling the pinch, it’s no wonder that some are less than eager to send out invites. ____(2) ____. Plus, it can’t hurt that in celebrity circles getting married in secret is all the rage. ____ (3) ____. “I would definitely say that secret weddings are becoming more common,” says Landis Bejar, the founder of a therapy practice, which specialises in helping brides and grooms manage wedding stress. “People are looking for ways to get out of the spotlight and avoid the pomp and circumstance of weddings. ____ (4) ____. They just want to get to the part where they are married.”
A. Option 1
B. Option 2
C. Option 3
D. Option 4

Answer: D

What were the Grammar & Sentence questions on the CAT 2022 exam?

Question 4: There is a sentence that is missing in the paragraph below. Look at the paragraph and decide where (option 1, 2, 3 or 4) the following sentence would best fit.

Sentence: For theoretical purposes, arguments may be considered as freestanding entities, abstracted from their contexts of use in actual human activities.

Paragraph : (1). An argument can be defined as a complex symbolic structure where some parts, known as the premises, offer support to another part, the conclusion. Alternatively, an argument can be viewed as a complex speech act consisting of one or more acts of premising (which assert propositions in favor of the conclusion), an act of concluding, and a stated or implicit marker ("hence", "therefore") that indicates that the conclusion follows from the premises.. (2)_. The relation of support between premises and conclusion can be cashed out in different ways: the premises may guarantee the truth of the conclusion, or make its truth more probable; the premises may imply the conclusion; the premises may make the conclusion more acceptable (or assertible).(3)__. But depending on one's explanatory goals, there is also much to be gained from considering arguments as they in fact occur in human communicative practices.
A. Option 2
B. Option 1
C. Option 4
D. Option 3

Answer: D

What were the Grammar and Sentence questions on the CAT 2021 exam?

Question 5: Vocabulary used in speech or writing organizes itself in seven parts of speech (eight, if you count interjections such as Oh! and Gosh! and Fuhgeddaboudit!). Communication composed of these parts of speech must be organized by rules of grammar upon which we agree. When these rules break down, confusion and misunderstanding result. Bad grammar produces bad sentences.

My favorite example from Strunk and White is this one: “As a mother of five, with another one on the way, my ironing board is always up.” Nouns and verbs are the two indispensable parts of writing. Without one of each, no group of words can be a sentence, since a sentence is, by definition, a group of words containing a subject (noun) and a predicate (verb); these strings of words begin with a capital letter, end with a period, and combine to make a complete thought which starts in the writer’s head and then leaps to the reader’s.

Must you write complete sentences each time, every time? Perish the thought. If your work consists only of fragments and floating clauses, the Grammar Police aren’t going to come and take you away. Even William Strunk, that Mussolini of rhetoric, recognized the delicious pliability of language. “It is an old observation,” he writes, “that the best writers sometimes disregard the rules of rhetoric.” Yet he goes on to add this thought, which I urge you to consider: “Unless he is certain of doing well, [the writer] will probably do best to follow the rules.”

The telling clause here is Unless he is certain of doing well. If you don’t have a rudimentary grasp of how the parts of speech translate into coherent sentences, how can you be certain that you are doing well? How will you know if you’re doing ill, for that matter? The answer, of course, is that you can’t, you won’t. One who does grasp the rudiments of grammar finds a comforting simplicity at its heart, where there need be only nouns, the words that name, and verbs, the words that act.
Take any noun, put it with any verb, and you have a sentence. It never fails. Rocks explode. Jane transmits. Mountains float. 

These are all perfect sentences. Many such thoughts make little rational sense, but even the stranger ones (Plums deify!) have a kind of poetic weight that’s nice. The simplicity of noun-verb construction is useful—at the very least it can provide a safety net for your writing. Strunk and White caution against too many simple sentences in a row, but simple sentences provide a path you can follow when you fear getting lost in the tangles of rhetoric—all those restrictive and nonrestrictive clauses, those modifying phrases, those appositives and compound-complex sentences. If you start to freak out at the sight of such unmapped territory (unmapped by you, at least), just remind yourself that rocks explode, Jane transmits, mountains float, and plums deify. Grammar is . . . the pole you grab to get your thoughts up on their feet and walking.

Q 1: Which one of the following statements, if false, could be seen as supporting the arguments in the passage?
A) An understanding of grammar helps a writer decide if she/he is writing well or not.
B) Regarding grammar, women writers tend to be more attentive to method and accuracy.
C) It has been observed that writers sometimes disregard the rules of rhetoric.
D) Perish the thought that complete sentences necessarily need nouns and verbs

Answer: B

Q 2: “Take any noun, put it with any verb, and you have a sentence. It never fails. Rocks explode. Jane transmits. Mountains float.”
None of the following statements can be seen as similar EXCEPT:
A) A collection of people with the same sports equipment is a sports team.
B) Take any vegetable, put some spices in it, and you have a dish.
C) A group of nouns arranged in a row becomes a sentence.
D) Take an apple tree, plant it in a field, and you have an orchard

Answer: C

Q 3: Inferring from the passage, the author could be most supportive of which one of the following practices?
A) The availability of language software that will standardise the rules of grammar as an aid to writers
B) A campaign demanding that a writer’s creative license should allow the breaking of grammatical rules.
C) A Creative Writing course that focuses on how to avoid the use of rhetoric.
D) The critique of standardised rules of punctuation and capitalisation.

Answer: D

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