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25+ Parajumble Questions for CAT with SOLUTIONS

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Parajumble Questions for the CAT exam are part of the Verbal Ability section in the CAT exam. Through Parajumble questions, aspirants are asked for sentence arrangement. The difficulty level of the Parajumble questions can be easy to moderate.

CAT Para Jumbles Practice questions for the CAT exam

Question 1: Five jumbled up sentences (labelled 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5), related to a topic, are given below. Four of them can be put together to form a coherent paragraph. Identify the odd sentence and key in
the number of that sentence as your answer.

1. In English, there is no systematic rule for the naming of numbers; after ten, we have "eleven" and "twelve" and then the teens: "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen" and so on.

2. Even more confusingly, some English words invert the numbers they refer to: the word "fourteen" puts the four first, even though it appears last.

3. It can take children a while to learn all these words, and understand that "fourteen" is different from "forty".

4. For multiples of 10, English speakers switch to a different pattern: "twenty", "thirty", "forty" and so on.

5. If you didn't know the word for "eleven", you would be unable to just guess it you might come up with something like "one-teen".

Level: Easy

Answer: 4,1,2,3,5

Must-do Para Jumbles questions for the CAT exam

Question 2: Five jumbled up sentences (labelled 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5), related to a topic, are given below. Four of them can be put together to form a coherent paragraph. Identify the odd sentence and key in the number of that sentence as your answer.

1. Self-care particularly links to loneliness, behavioural problems, and negative academic outcomes.

2. “Latchkey children” refers to children who routinely return home from school to empty homes and take care of themselves for extended periods of time.

3. Although self-care generally points to negative outcomes, it is important to consider that the bulk of research has yet to track long-term consequences.

4. In research and practice, the phrase “children in self-care” has come to replace latchkey in an effort to more accurately reflect the nature of their circumstances.

5. Although parents might believe that self-care would be beneficial for development, recent research has found quite the opposite.

Level: Moderate

Answer: 5,4,1,3,2

Most Important Para Jumble Question for CAT

Question 3: The four sentences (labelled 1, 2, 3 and 4) given below, when properly sequenced, would yield a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper sequencing of the order of the sentences and key
in the sequence of the four numbers as your answer.

1. Algorithms hosted on the internet are accessed by many, so biases in Al models have resulted in much larger impact, adversely affecting far larger groups of people.

2. Though "algorithmic bias" is the popular term, the foundation of such bias is not in algorithms, but in the data; algorithms are not biased, data is, as algorithms merely reflect
persistent patterns that are present in the training data.

3. Despite their widespread impact, it is relatively easier to fix Al biases than human-generated biases, as it is simpler to identify the former than to try to make people unlearn behaviors learnt over generations.

4. The impact of biased decisions made by humans is localised and geographically confined, but with the advent of Al, the impact of such decisions is spread over a much wider scale.

Level: Moderate

Answer: 4,1,2,3,5

Find Some Previous Year Para Jumble Questions for CAT

Question 4: The four sentences (labelled 1, 2, 3 and 4) given below, when properly sequenced, would yield a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper sequencing of the order of the sentences and key
in the sequence of the four numbers as your answer.

1. Like the ants that make up a colony, no single neuron holds complex information like selfawareness, hope or pride.

2. Although the human brain is not yet understood enough to identify the mechanism by which emergence functions, most neurobiologists agree that complex interconnections
among the parts give rise to qualities that belong only to the whole.

3. Nonetheless, the sum of all neurons in the nervous system generate complex human emotions like fear and joy, none of which can be attributed to a single neuron.

4. Human consciousness is often called an emergent property of the human brain.

Level: Difficult

Answer: 5,3,4,2,1

What are some other important CAT Verbal Ability Questions with Solutions?

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